Kōrero

Loading

Steph Matuku: Putting Māori kids on the page

“It’s so important for me to get Māori kids on the page, which is why my protagonists are always Māori. Because when I was growing up, you just didn’t see yourself.”

Kris Faafoi — a minister on the rise

“Pacific Islanders do things a bit differently — especially because of their respect for authority or for elders. But you can have respect and still question without challenging offensively.”

Andrew Little: Stepping aside — and forward

“I had confidence in Jacinda. That’s the other thing I’ve learned on my journey. It’s the importance of recognising talent — including talent that’s better than you.”

Ainsley Gardiner: The power is never ours

“I think the global indigenous cinema needs a global indigenous fund. We need to see the value of our stories, which somebody else takes the profit from.”

Tāmati Kruger: Down that way, glory waits

“Mana whenua has to do with acknowledging that the land has mana, and fulfilling your obligations and your kinship relationship with the land. That’s what it is — not an ownership or property relationship.”

Madeleine Sami: No holding her back

"I was so lucky to grow up with my 23 cousins. We all liked to joke around. I was used to banter and coming back with one-liners. And being a smartarse."

Ruakere Hond: A language and a legacy

“If we're not going to use the reo on a regular basis in our homes, as we’re raising our children, we're probably going to miss the main way forward for reo Māori.”

Chelsea Winstanley: My idol was Merata Mita

‘I loved listening to Nan’s stories about how, when she was a little girl, she’d sit there with her nanny, who used to smoke a pipe … and read the Pākehā newspaper to her in te reo Māori.”

Bobbie Hunter: Maths belongs in every culture

“I have come to realise that maths belongs in every culture. Yet, kids growing up in New Zealand get taught that there’s only one way of doing maths, and that’s a white way. As I see it, my Cook Islands family were the real mathematicians.”

Tipene O’Regan: We must remember to remember

My mother used to say: “Forgive thine enemies, my son, but write down their names.” You forgive and remember what you've got to do because you can't keep carrying those things forever.

Leonie Pihama: Let’s start by returning the Waitara land

“If I could do anything today, it would be to have the Waitara lands returned to the hapū. For me, it's about self-determination, and seeing hapū rangatiratanga that was guaranteed in Te Tiriti o Waitangi becoming embedded in this country.”

Jamie Tuuta: When I go home, I’m still Boy

"I like taking the kids back to Waitara and Urenui. Going back home and realising that wi-fi is not the norm ... that Sky television is not normal either. Most of the whānau don't have doors on their bedrooms, let alone wallpaper on the walls. There's a stark contrast that they can see."

Vui Mark Gosche: From groundsman to chairman of the board

"I've been through tough times … and it’s made me much better equipped to do the health work that I do now, because I understand, through my own experience, just how tough disabilities and mental health problems can be on families.” - Counties Manukau DHB chair Mark Gosche.

Brian Easton: Māori have been trapped in a poverty cycle

“The truth is that the Treaty settlements aren't that big. Initially, when the $1 billion fiscal cap for the settlements was announced, I calculated that what was needed was in fact around $100 billion. So Māori are getting a very small contribution.”

Simon Bridges: Our leaders should be culturally competent

“If you're an MP — and certainly if you're a leader of a party — you should be thinking these things through, and upskilling yourself to make sure you have the maximum cultural competence and a sense of the full breadth of the issues we're dealing with as a country.”

Vincent O’Malley: Too many Pākehā don’t know our history

Vincent O'Malley is a New Zealand historian who, over the last 20 years, has been focusing on how Māori and Pākehā have been getting along. His research has led not just to a PhD from Victoria University but also to articles in scholarly journals, blogs, and a series of influential books.

Gilbert Enoka’s winning formula

Graham Henry and Steve Hansen used to say to me: “Where are you going with this, Bert?” And I’d say: “I don’t know. But I know I’m heading in the right direction.”

Michael Meredith — The Good Chef

Not many master chefs spend their mornings making school lunches for Auckland’s poorest kids. But that’s Michael Meredith.

About

E-Tangata is an online Sunday magazine specialising in stories that reflect the experiences of Māori and Pasifika in Aotearoa.

Contact

We welcome submissions or inquiries to:
editor@e-tangata.co.nz

Subscribe

Sign up for our new email newsletter and be in to win one of 40 copies of The Best of E-Tangata.

Subscribe

PressPatron

You can support E-Tangata’s kaupapa by contributing through PressPatron. With your help, we can tell more Māori and Pacific stories.