Kōrero

‘Vea, you made me cry’

“There was a really beautiful thing that happened during the filming. We had a change of heart which changed our head.” — Vea Mafile’o on learning to understand her father through the making of ‘For My Father’s Kingdom’.

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Comment & Analysis

Beyond the Dusky Maiden

“Even in the most liberal of spaces, such as universities that publicly commit to being a space that welcomes and celebrates Pasifika, we see a pattern of racism and sexism.”

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Caren Rangi: Leading and dancing

“Being able to express myself as a Cook Islander through dancing and singing and teaching is still important for me.” — Caren Rangi.

Kura Forrester: Rudely funny

“Everybody knows what it's like to be on a first date. Or have rude thoughts. And, as long as you're being honest, it can be funny.” — Kura Forrester, Billy T award winner.

Comment & Analysis

The whakapapa of our literature

“Instead of placing Māori and Pacific literatures as late arrivals to English literature, we instead recognise a whakapapa of Māori literature that goes all the way back to Te Moana nui a Kiwa.”

A good death

“Those who cannot truly and freely choose should be protected by the state, not exposed to greater risk of death.”

Now there’s hope

"Let’s be honest. Both sides of politics abandoned the provinces last century. The Provincial Growth Fund is the first injection of capital in a long time."

Reflections

The singing island

“There is no airstrip. To get to Takū, you book a passage on the supply ship — if it's sailing. Last year, not a single ship visit was made. Cut off from outside supplies, the islanders relied entirely on their traditional food sources: fish, coconut and occasional taro."

Merata — a son’s tribute

“My hunger for the past came out of a need to process my own grief, rather than a desire to study the history.” — Hepi Mita, on making a film about his mum, Merata.

Identity

Reo

Media

Arts

History

Māori in the First World War

When the First World War broke out in 1914, the wars of the 1860s, the subsequent land confiscations, and the invasion of Parihaka in 1881 were still fresh in the memories of many Māori.

Decolonising the Pacific

"Colonialism had done little to develop or educate those people it ruled, so for many Pacific — especially Polynesian — people, leaving their homelands was often seen as one of the few routes to economic and social advancement.”

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